Infradapt Blog

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John Reilly is Managing Partner at Infradapt, LLC. Prior to joining Infradapt, he was the President of Vital IT Solutions, Inc., where among other roles, he developed a methodology and approach for performing risk and compliance assessments.



Prior to Infradapt, Mr. Reilly founded Vital IT Solutions, Inc., Mr. Reilly worked with Expanets, Inc., as a Senior Converged Account Executive, specializing in VoIP and Security, and a Subject Matter Expert (SME) on HIPAA. His Expanets’ achievements included national Sales awards including Millionaire’s Club and pioneering VoIP deployments for regional clients.

Mr. Reilly also has direct work experience in the banking industry, where he worked in Sales and Management, and in manufacturing, where he worked as an Accountant. John earned his BS in Accounting at Gwynedd-Mercy College, while also studying Negotiation, Decision Making, and Creative Problem Solving. He holds a SANS GIAC security certification and is a member of the Philadelphia Chapter of InfraGard.


 

Is Streaming Cutting Into Your Business’ Productivity?

Is Streaming Cutting Into Your Business’ Productivity?

Streaming in the office is a topic of hot debate amongst business owners, and for good reason. Depending on the type of media being streamed, it can either enhance or hinder office productivity. What does your company need to know about streaming, and what you can do about employees who can’t resist the urge?

Acceptable Uses of Streaming
First of all, we want to emphasize that not all streaming is bad for productivity. There are certain media types that will be necessary for certain employees to unlock their full potential. For example, let’s say that you have an employee who works better in areas with minimal distraction. If your other employees are being too noisy collaborating (or not), this employee can put on a pair of headphones and listen to music streamed from an online app to drown out the sound.

You also might need to look at a video during your normal workday for work purposes. Perhaps it is an important news article about a new workplace trend, or perhaps it’s a training video that is needed in order to fully master a new software solution. Regardless, there will generally be some reason to stream something or another, but this doesn’t mean that it’s always acceptable.

Unacceptable Uses for Streaming
If you have an employee who is streaming video at all times, you’re dealing with an employee who simply isn’t working to the best of their ability. They are doing your business and themselves a disservice. Not only is streaming distracting, but it can also use up a lot of your bandwidth, leading to a lot of slowdown on other network-connected devices.

For the problem employees who just can’t keep their eyes off of YouTube, Netflix, or Hulu, you can implement a content filter. What this does is keeps them focused on the workday by eliminating access to specific sites. This can be anything ranging from social media sites and streaming sites to dangerous malware-infected sites that are dangerous to browse.

If your organization wants to implement a content filter, Infradapt can help. To learn more, reach out to us at 800.394.2301.

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These 3 Industries are Being Fundamentally Changed by Smart Technology

These 3 Industries are Being Fundamentally Changed by Smart Technology

Smart technology has seen explosive growth in recent years, leading to an uptick in startups popping up to capitalize on smart tech and the innovative ways it can be leveraged. With demand for such devices increasing exponentially, it’s little wonder that many industries are diving into this technology. Today, we’ll discuss three of them.


Energy and Conservation
It should come as no surprise that a major driving force behind the use of smart technology is for this technology to use energy and natural resources more intelligently. Of course, it also doesn’t hurt that smart technology allows us to save time and money as well, through the automation of processes that once required a human touch to complete. In addition to making homes ‘smarter’ and more accommodating to the needs of those living in them, smart tech has been proven to be a major player in environmental conservation. Automated devices have been able to track and report on various kinds of environmental data, including waterflow, plant health, migration patterns, and many other variables, allowing us to use this data to improve our treatment of our environment.

Fitness and Health
Ever since the first ‘smart’ shoe - the Micropacer - was introduced in 1984 by Adidas, smart technology and fitness have been close companions. In just the past few years, devices like fitness bands and smartwatches have exploded in popularity, and more innovations have followed fast.

As fitness bands and watches have become more intelligent, the technology that powers them and their functions has improved as well. Now, features like application integration, improved functionality, and quicker response times are available in fabric form. These smart fabrics have led to innovations like smart socks and undergarments, fitness rings, shoe inserts, and other activewear and accessories hitting the market en masse. Using these technologies, everyone from the active exerciser to the casual enthusiast will be able to better measure and optimize their workout regimen, even avoiding injury.

Transportation
All over the world, one of the biggest time sinks is the battle to get from point A to point B. In many places, the commute to work can be stretched due to traffic congestion, and in others, impractical traffic patterns extend the amount of time spent sitting behind the wheel. This is one issue that is actively being worked on through smart technology now, as is evident by the aggressive research and development into driverless transportation. After all, with machine learning and AI behind the wheel, traffic as a whole could become a cohesive network, rather than the mass of individual, autonomous bodies all looking out for number one.

This is a concept that has long been considered as a solution for the persistent issues with mass transportation that have been evident since, well, mass transportation became a common thing. We have never been closer to successfully revolutionizing automated transportation in a way that is practical for widespread application. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and other places have experimented with concepts like Uber’s driverless cars. While this initiative didn’t go quite according to plan, it still demonstrated that this technology is on the cusp of market readiness.

What are your opinions on smart technology? Do you see it being adopted in more aspects of life, or do you see it as being a short-lived interest? Talk about it in the comments section!

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What is Nanotechnology, and How Can it Be Used?

What is Nanotechnology, and How Can it Be Used?

Technology is seemingly being made smaller and smaller. Just think about the size of the computers from the mid ‘90s until now. Sure, you can still buy huge a gaming PC with a four-foot tower with liquid cooling, or one that is a fish tank (complete with fake fish); but, the computer you use the most fits in the palm of your hand.


Nanotechnology is the smallest “technology” yet. At its core, it’s a manipulation of the smallest elements of matter, measured in nanometers. Consider that your fingernails grow at about a rate of a nanometer per second, or that a single molecule of water is about a quarter of a nanometer across, and it will give you an idea just how small a nanometer is. It is quite literally one-billionth of a meter.

That’s really the start. Nanotechnology deals with anything in that arena that measures between 1 and 100 nanometers, and largely consists of the engineering of structures that function inside or alongside nature’s nanomachine, cells.

How Is This Technology?
It really is a true combination of science, engineering, and technology. To answer the question, engineers are currently at work attempting to create smaller, more powerful microprocessors that could be used to adjust the practical uses of every material of the physical world. You could make structures stronger, cure disease, and alter matter at the subatomic level. If that’s not technology, I don’t know what is.

When semiconductor manufacturers create the latest and greatest processors or microprocessors for use in a myriad of devices, they measure their nodes in nanometers. Today, these manufacturers are working on the five nanometer chip--a feat thought impossible by many - until IBM announced they had developed one. If DNA is only two nanometers across, we may only be a short time until machines will fit everywhere.

Why Don’t People Know About It?
Nanotechnology is in its relative infancy. In 2017, Dr. George Tulevski of IBM spoke to the challenges the field faces going forward. His perspective was that nanotechnology development and research actually has slowed since the 1980s. In the same TED Talk, he opined that the use of carbon nanotubes could potentially improve computing tenfold, but the development of this technology is just in its early stages.

Is This Technology a Good Thing?
With people today only having a limited understanding of the technology, there aren’t a lot of trustworthy opinions on the issue. Intellectia even seem hedged about the applications of nanotechnology. On one hand, theoretically it could do more than any other technology to help the human race. On the other, any technology made from wonder, and with benevolent intentions, can also be manufactured for malevolent use. Like with other contemporary technologies such as artificial intelligence, researchers will have to move slowly and not let potential profits influence their release of products involving nanotechnology.

Do you consider nanotechnology to be interesting? Would you like to see how far this rabbit hole goes, or should we as a people leave well enough alone? Leave your thoughts in our comments section below, and return to read more great technology blogs from Infradapt.

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Tech Term: Bandwidth

Tech Term: Bandwidth

Here’s a question we want you to take a second to consider...How much do you rely on the Internet? The answer for almost everyone is that it is essential to your current quality of life. Technologies have been developed, industries have been launched, and literally billions of people use it every day, making it one of the predominant inventions in human history. At the heart of this phenomenal technology is bandwidth.


The term bandwidth, in the context of the Internet, is the volume of information per unit of time that a transmission medium can handle. Simply put, the larger the bandwidth your connection has the faster the data can move through the medium. Bandwidth is measured in the amount of data transferred per second, specifically megabits per second (mostly written Mbps or Mb/s). Megabytes, written MB is not typically used in measuring bandwidth as a connection that is advertised as 15 MB is actually 1.875 Mbps since there are eight bits in every byte.

Most Internet Service Providers, or ISPs, will sell packages of a certain megabits, but if you really want to ascertain the bandwidth your computer is running on, your best bet is to use one of the numerous Internet speed test sites like the one at speedtest.net.

The best analogy, and the one that we’ll use, is that of plumbing. It’s said that data is to available bandwidth as water is to the size of a pipe. As bandwidth increases more data can be transferred through it, just as a larger pipe passes more water. Increasing bandwidth, or finding a larger pipe, will allow for even more data/water transfer. For the average user that only uses a couple of apps, a web browser, and doesn’t stream media, a small bandwidth connection will work fine. For tech-savvy families or very small businesses that have multiple devices connected to the Internet at once, they will find they will need more bandwidth to do the things they want to do seamlessly. Larger businesses will need enterprise-level bandwidth of multiple hundred Mbps.

Your Internet connection isn’t the only place where bandwidth comes into play. If you have a website, you will have to pay for a bandwidth level that is commensurate with the traffic and data interaction. In many cases, the more bandwidth you need, the more you will need to pay for hosting.

For more information about technology terms that confuse you, visit our blog, or contact our technology professionals at 800.394.2301.

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What Kind of Insurance Can Your Business Get for Potential Data Loss?

What Kind of Insurance Can Your Business Get for Potential Data Loss?

We want to talk a little bit about cyber liability insurance and why it’s important that your business understands what is covered and what isn’t. It’s something that no business actually wants to talk about as the worst-case scenario is often a bit too unnerving to consider.


If you’ve never heard of cyber liability insurance, it’s insurance that allows you to pay a company for protection against events that might cause data loss or other similar damage to your computing infrastructure. We know what you’re thinking--”That’s why I pay for security software, like antivirus and firewalls.” While it’s true that the two are somewhat conceptually similar, it’s not always so simple.

Let’s say that a hacker has stolen data from a company. That company then becomes liable for the data that’s been stolen, whether it’s personally identifiable information, medical, or financial data. A perfect example of this is the Equifax breach, which exposed the credit information over a hundred million consumers. Equifax was able to stay in business after one of the worst data breaches in history, although it is still relatively early in the process. Sources have stated that their cyber liability insurance would have covered up to $150 million worth of restitution, but with over 140 million people’s personally identifiable information being exposed, the liability will should easily blow past that.

Chances are that your business doesn’t deal with 14,000 customers, let alone 140 million, but cyber liability insurance is an effective backup plan if your network or infrastructure is breached, and your customer’s sensitive data is stolen. Responsible businesses will have defensive tactics installed to protect the data from direct assault. One such solution is an antivirus. Depending on the product that you use, or who offers it, any damage done by a data breach or virus on your network might only be covered under incredibly specific circumstances. If the antivirus crashes, or if it’s not up to date, the insurance provider may not be liable, and will roundly refuse to reimburse your organization in the event that it is inundated with malware; or is the victim of a data breach. As true with any insurance, if the situation doesn’t line up with the language in the agreement, they are not beholden to honor a claim.

Of course, we’re not insurance professionals, nor do we pretend to be. We just want to make sure that you know where your business stands on cyber liability insurance, and what you can do to increase your awareness. There are many reasons why your business would decide that they need cyber liability insurance. With data now being viewed as more of a commodity than ever, you are seeing organizations invest more in the protection of their data. Since any situation in which cyber liability insurance would trigger would have resulted in data being stolen of lost, companies need to manage all the negative aspects associated with losing customer’s data, which outside of the obvious data loss, includes ensuring that their organizational reputation isn’t completely toxic to new and existing customers.

You can start by making sure that your business’ antivirus is always up to date for the latest security threats. Infradapt can be counted on to keep your antivirus ready to tackle all of the latest threats your organization faces. We can remotely patch and secure your company servers, workstations, and network components so that they’ll be secure against all manners of viruses, malware, and other threats.

Remember, we’re not insurance experts, but we do know our way around technology, and are experts in protecting organizations against the cyber threats they face. To learn more about how we can help you keep your technology from being a pain in the neck, reach out to us at 800.394.2301.

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