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ALERT: Change Your Twitter Password, Says Twitter

ALERT: Change Your Twitter Password, Says Twitter

Twitter is recommending that all 336 million users change their passwords as soon as possible due to the discovery of an internal security flaw. While the issue has been fixed and no data breach seems to have taken place, Twitter is clearly taking this situation seriously.


On Thursday, May 3, it came to light that there was an internal log upon which an undisclosed number of account passwords were recorded without any protection. As a result, this unknown amount of passwords can no longer be considered secure, even though there is no apparent evidence that any data breach has occurred.

Twitter uses a process called hashing to protect their passwords, as many companies do. However, a bug created a log of passwords before they were hashed, leaving them fully legible. This bug has since been resolved.

In response to this situation, Twitter is being proactive and recommending that all of its users change their passwords, just in case. To do so, log in to your account in your browser, access Settings and privacy, and from there, Password. It is also a good idea to enable two-factor authentication by accessing Settings and privacy, clicking into Account. Once there, click on the “Set up login verification” button and follow the instructions. You will find yourself on a Login verification screen, where you can activate the means to generate another authentication code.

While disaster seems to be averted this time, you should not hesitate to change your password as soon as possible, and makes sure that all of your online accounts have strong passwords in place. For more information about keeping your identity safe online, call the IT professionals at Infradapt at 800.394.2301.

 

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3 Ways Your Business Can Prioritize Data Security

3 Ways Your Business Can Prioritize Data Security

In the wake of the Equifax data breach, which placed the personal information of 143 million users at risk, the issue of data security is at the forefront of social consciousness. Your organization needs to go about its daily business as if it will experience a data breach at any given moment. This involves looking at the worst-case scenario, and planning for it so that you’re never caught unaware.

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Chances Are, Your Employees Care More for Convenience Than Network Security

Chances Are, Your Employees Care More for Convenience Than Network Security

b2ap3_thumbnail_network_security_failure_400.jpgSecurity is a top concern for anyone that utilizes the Internet. The problem for businesses is that the average employee probably doesn’t care much for your security practices, and it can be challenging to get them to comply without upsetting them.


Employees tend not to follow security practices that they find inconvenient, unnecessary, or time-consuming. The issue here is that the best solutions are often designed to keep data secure, while also making it somewhat more difficult to access crucial accounts. A good example of how security is undermined by employee indifference can be seen in a Bring Your Own Device policy. While it might make it more difficult for hackers to access your data, your employees might not want to go through the process of setting up BYOD on their own devices, which can put your data at risk.

Ultimately, it becomes a question of freedom vs security. Your employees want to use their own mobile devices and be free to work how they want, but this cannot happen without sacrificing security oversight. Unfortunately, this is a point that you have to insist on if you want to ensure maximum security for your critical data. It’s your responsibility to make sure that your team is following proper best practices in order to facilitate the further functionality of your organization.

If your team tends to dodge following best practices, this is even more important and necessary. Many outside threats understand that your employees are likely the weakest link in your business’s security, making them big targets for the likes of hackers and scammers. Unlike security patches and updates, this is a vulnerability that won’t go away with a software update. You have to educate your staff on the following best practices:

  • Regularly changing passwords: All of your employees should be using complex passwords, which include lower and upper-case letters, numbers, and symbols. Changing your passwords frequently is also important, but if you’re always changing to complex passwords, you’re sure to forget them once in a while. An enterprise-level password manager can be exceptionally beneficial to securely store and retrieve passwords when they’re needed.
  • Stopping phishing scams: Employees need to know how to look for phishing scams that may hit their inbox. This includes educating your team members on how phishing scams work, and what the telltale signs are for them. Infradapt can help your employees understand how best to avoid and detect phishing scams.
  • Using two-factor authentication: Accounts that have access to important information need to be using secondary security features, like two-factor authentication, in order to best protect your data. This makes it more difficult for hackers to access accounts remotely. Many two-factor authentication procedures require physical access to devices, which makes it much more difficult for hackers to compromise an account.

If you think you’re at risk of hacking attacks due to lack of adherence to security measures, you should implement a Unified Threat Management (UTM) solution. With a firewall, antivirus, spam blocking, and content filtering solution, your business will experience minimal exposure to threats, and promptly eliminate those that do manage to get into your systems.

For more information about cybersecurity and other data security best practices, give Infradapt a call at 800.394.2301.

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Tip of the Week: Make Your Password Rhyme Every Time

Tip of the Week: Make Your Password Rhyme Every Time

b2ap3_thumbnail_security_for_your_passwords_400.jpgPassword security is quite the conundrum. We want our passwords to be easy to remember, but the problem is that passwords that are easy to remember are often simple and insecure. Therefore, it becomes a best practice to use complicated passwords with both upper and lower-case letters, numbers, and symbols to compensate. The “passpoem” might resolve this issue in the most obvious way.

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Can “Spaced Repetition” Be the Key to Remembering Complex Passwords?

Can “Spaced Repetition” Be the Key to Remembering Complex Passwords?

b2ap3_thumbnail_password_login_400.jpgIs the password an outdated type of security measure? This question seems to be getting asked around quite a bit, especially with more powerful threats loose all over the Internet. Unfortunately, the fault in passwords generally lies in the fact that humans generally don’t pick passwords that are secure enough. Thanks to a new method called “spaced repetition,” it seems there might be some hope left for the password after all.

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